Motorola Droid Bionic Pages Pulled, Despite Being “Not Cancelled”

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Even after Motorola responded to all the rumors surrounding the supposed cancellation of its Droid Bionic, we’ve been left with plenty of questions. Though the company stated that the phone was still on-track for a release, albeit a delayed one, it didn’t provide much in the way of an explanation for the bad situation the Bionic had found itself in. After all, it’s not usual for a phone to be in late-phase testing, with a rumored release date under a month away, only to be shelved so it could receive “enhancements”. Last we heard, Motorola was still prepping the Droid for a release this summer. That’s what makes it so odd to learn that the company seems to be in the middle of removing Bionic-related pages from its site.

When you go to Motorola’s main Android page, there’s still a section advertising the Bionic with its 4G LTE speeds courtesy of Verizon. You used to be able to click through to a Bionic-specific page, but now you’re redirected to generic mobile phone support, instead. Even retrieving the original URL to the Bionic page will dump you back into phone support.

We’d expect to see the existing page maybe plastered-over with a “coming this summer” graphic, in light of the delay, but this action seems a bit overreaching if the phone really is only getting a few enhancements before its release. It seems like either the overhaul will be a little more thorough than expected, requiring new promo materials, or maybe Motorola has decided to throw in the towel, after all.

Source: Motorola

Via: Droid-life

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!