RIM Extends BlackBerry Trade Up Program to Canada

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Two months back, RIM started a new BlackBerry buy-back program, letting you sell the company your unwanted BlackBerry smartphones and get a credit towards the purchase of a shiny, new model. At the time, the offer only extended to customer in the United States. Now a whole set of new BlackBerry owners can take advantage of the deals, as RIM has expanded access to include Canada.

Depending on which BlackBerry you’re interested in trading in, you could qualify for a payout as high as $170 (RIM advertises up to $120, but several phones are worth more). An old Pearl 8130 will only get you $5, whereas only a Torch 9800 will fetch the full $170.

There’s an additional credit you can qualify for depending on both what your existing phone is, and which model you’re upgrading to. This credit is calculated more generously for users making a big jump, helping to offset the middling price offered for the trade-in of smartphones like that Pearl 8130; moving from that to any of the latest models will net you an extra $35 credit.

You may be able to make a little more selling your used BlackBerry on eBay or Craigslist, but RIM’s program is simple and straightforward, if you’d just rather avoid the hassle of dealing with a buyer. You also wouldn’t be privy to the upgrade credit if you took matters into your own hands. Your phone will have to be in good, working order to qualify for the buy-back, with no water damage or display issues. If you qualify, head over to RIM’s site to see what your old BlackBerry is worth.

Via: Mobile Syrup

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!