Nokia: Symbian “Open” But Not Open Source

Advertisement

Last week Nokia started administering the Symbian source repository on its own servers, after the Symbian Foundation dissolved in the fall. While Nokia announced that the files were there, you couldn’t gain access to them without registering with Nokia as a development partner first. This started setting off alarm bells in those concerned with Symbian’s status as an open source operating system. Nokia has made a follow-up blog post to clarify the situation, insisting that the future of Symbian development is still “open” to interested parties, but it is no longer considered an open source project.

While Nokia is accepting registrations to gain access to the source, the company explains that it will only be approving those requests made by “platform collaborators”. This seems to create a nice little Catch-22 loop, where you need to be a collaborator to get access to the code, and would need to have the code already in order to be collaborating on the project. Such sentiments have been voiced by commenters responding to Nokia’s announcement, calling this a deceptive misuse of the term “open”.

Admittedly, this will likely have little effect on the development of Symbian, as there’s always been a great deal of control over the OS, but it’s a setback for open source advocates. The existing code that’s been released is still open, but future Symbian developments will be restricted to this close-knit group of parties approved by Nokia.

Source: Nokia

Via: Phone Scoop

Share This Post
Advertisement
What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!