Nexus S 4G Logo Foretells Sprint WiMAX Support?

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Google and Samsung’s Nexus S may be about to spread its wings from T-Mobile and get high-speed access to the networks of some other carriers, if the evidence we’ve come across stands true. An AT&T-compatible Nexus S has been hinted at by the existence of some FCC documents, using the model number GT-I9020A, with that “A” representing AT&T’s network. The case for a Sprint version of the Nexus S is a little less solid, but the revelation of a 4G-emblazoned logo for the phone has us rethinking things.

Sprint will be hosting an event at CTIA, coming up in just a few days. An Engadget tipster has claimed that Sprint will be revealing, among other products, a WiMAX-compatible version of the Nexus S. After hearing this rumor, we checked up on Sprint’s site and found a 404’d landing page for the Nexus S, but one that suggested that Sprint was preparing to use the URL at a later date. Up until then, the idea of the Sprint Nexus S was plausible but lacked any real evidence suggesting it could happen.

Today Engadget published another tipster find, a new Nexus S logo advertising its 4G connectivity. While there’s nothing immediately Sprint-related about it, it was provided by one of the site’s known sources for good Sprint info. We’ll just have to wait until CTIA to know for sure if we’ll really have a WiMAX Nexus S option to choose from, but it’s starting to look like a real possibility.

Source: Engadget

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!