LG Revolution Won’t Ship With Inductive Charging, Will Get It Later?

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LG’s Revolution is poised to make a big impression on smartphone buyers, as it’s in line to be the first Android allowed to stream Netflix content, as well as to be the first Verizon device to use voice-over-LTE once the service becomes available. The first round of FCC documentation for the Revolution has now been published, including a document discussing a missing feature we hadn’t touched upon in previous Revolution coverage: wireless charging.

Charging phones by means of magnetic induction is a bit of an under-deployed feature, notably popping up in Palm hardware. In February at the MWC, Fulton Innovation showed off its inductive technology, including a wireless charging option for the Revolution. The adapter would replace the phone’s back panel, making the smartphone slightly thicker as a consequence.

In the FCC documents, LG has filed a memo declaring that the Revolution isn’t ready for inductive charging, that there’s no hardware support currently, and that the company will prepare the appropriate documents for the charger once it’s available. This seems to imply that LG will at some point offer the Revolution pre-configured with Fulton Innovation’s add-on; we wonder if it will be available separately as an accessory of if that will be the only way to get it.

We’re still not sure when the Revolution will become available, but if the Thunderbolt continues to keep hiding, we may be in store for having our choice among Verizon LTE smartphones when they finally arrive.

Source: FCC, Engadget

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!