Nokia’s Future Symbian^3 UI Looks A Bit Android-y

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Despite the recent news of a Nokia-Microsoft collaboration, leading the smartphone manufacturer to begin producing Windows Phone 7 devices, Symbian doesn’t look like it’s going anywhere as an alternative OS for Nokia smartphones. While the company had been working on a next-gen Symbian^4, it decided to focus instead on implementing the sorts of changes it had in mind on the existing Symbian^3 platform. A product render used as a backdrop to a recent Nokia event now provides us with a glimpse of what the next of those Symbian^3 updates may be, showing a redesigned UI.

You see the changes most clearly by comparing this new image, at the above right, against the current implementation of Symbian^3 on the Nokia N8, at the top left. Thee mishmash of phone status icons, floating unrestrained above the background, will now be displayed in a single line against a solid background bar. This looks like a great move, freeing up screen space while hopefully not losing any utility.

We also notice a redesign of the interface buttons at the screen’s bottom, replacing them with a set of icons – this, too, looks like it will free up a bit more space on-screen. Both of these design changes feel very Android-y; perhaps imitation really is the sincerest form of flattery, or Nokia just wants to win over some existing Android users. It also looks like once this update comes out you’ll have a bit more freedom in customizing the phone, with fewer restrictions about the placement of widgets.

Source: My Nokia Blog

Via: Engadget

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!