INQ Cloud Touch “Facebook Phone” Gets Hands-On Review

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We’ve been hearing a bit about “Facebook phones” lately, with both INQ and HTC reported to be working on something along those lines. Since Facebook doesn’t plan on coming out with any phone hardware itself, these models are going to be all about custom software, bringing the Facebook experience out of an app and integrating it more intimately with the phone as a whole. Pocket-lint recently got the chance to play with INQ’s Cloud Touch, the first of these Facebook phones, giving us our first look at how that integration could work.

The Cloud Touch takes its Froyo roots and grafts on Facebook, everywhere it can. From the home screen’s Facebook icons, to a custom Facebook interface, the phone seems to scream “social networking”. It’s clear from the limited time that Pocket-lint got with the phone that this really is an integral part of the Touch and not just something tacked-on as an afterthought. In fact, the very first thing you’ll be prompted to do upon using the phone is to provide your Facebook credentials.

The phone also wins points for its design, with some stylish color choices and attention to detail. A hardware buttons gives you a quick glance at the phone’s status, reporting on connectivity, power, and storage capacity. While the 600MHz CPU sounds downright sluggish nowadays, you really don’t need a dual-core system for posting status updates and commenting on photos. That choice should also help keep the cost down, which is a godsend for a phone that could end up in the destructive hands of a teenager.

The Cloud Touch is expected to arrive in April.

Source: Pocket-lint

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!