Sony Ericsson Admits 2010 Failures, Plans ‘Big Step Forward For 2011’

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There were many ways in which certain smartphones failed to deliver last year; we took a look at some of our biggest letdowns in our year-end wrap-up. Sure, we can be picky, but we expect a lot from these devices and the companies that make them. While most just keep on churning out new models, putting the past behind them, Sony Ericsson has taken the humbling step of admitting that last year’s phones didn’t really measure up, and is trying to convince phone buyers that it now knows how to succeed in 2011.

Steve Walker, the company’s acting global head of marketing, recently spoke to Pocket-lint, where he reflected on how Sony Ericsson let down its users last year. He cited multiple issues, focusing on the company’s missteps in anticipating what consumers would feel most passionately about. A prime example he gave was how Sony Ericsson wasn’t expecting its users to care so passionately about just what version of Android their smartphones ran. The Xperia X10 was already behind the curve coming out with Donut, but only getting Eclair months later, and with no hope of Froyo and future editions, just shows the massive disconnect between those driving the company’s smartphone lineup, and the customers buying those phones.

Walker’s contrite statements are refreshing, but will the company actually change its ways? It needs to build ahead of the curve if it wants its hardware to have any sort of meaningful lifespan, and make sure it continues to support it in software once it’s released. The Arc looks like it could be a good start, but it’s still early in the year, and we’ll have to see how Sony Ericsson continues to act as 2011 rolls on.

Source: Pocket-lint

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!