Multi-Touch Input Hacked Onto Older Windows Mobile Devices

Advertisement

Remember the old days of resistive screens and styluses? Before capacitive touchscreens were the norm, multi-touch input was just a pipe dream, as those resistive screens could only detect a single touch contact at a time. Not content to let old technology simply die, one of the coders at the XDA-Developers forums has put together a hack that allows for multi-touch input on resistive-screened Windows Mobile devices.

Before you get too excited, this is more of a tech demonstration than a usable program, but it shows there’s definitely potential for the technique. The implementation uses an on-screen keyboard to show how the trick works. Instead of first tapping shift, followed by a letter in order to enter it as upper-case, this software lets you hold down the shift key while tapping in a series of letters.

There are limitations galore, like the inability to detect more than two inputs at once, and the inability to press just any two on-screen buttons at once (this version doesn’t let you press two letters simultaneously, for example). Accuracy also goes down as the two points you’re touching become farther apart on the screen, though you can train the software to correct its mistakes.

You can download MulKeyTouch now to try it out for yourself. We certainly don’t expect resistive screens to make a big comeback, but it’s still nice to see someone breathing life into old tech.

Source: XDA-Developers

Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!