Sprint Pulls Samsung Intercept Froyo Update: Bricking Phones

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We had thought that something like this would be impossible in this day and age of meticulous carrier testing, but apparently the Samsung Intercept Android 2.2 Froyo update which started rolling out on Friday has been bricking phones left and right, forcing Sprint to pull the package down and initiate damage control. The Sprint Community forum thread on the issue has already stretched to ten pages, with anecdotal evidence suggesting that the update wasn’t fully baked before it was pushed to subscriber handsets — which may be why they get stuck on a Samsung boot screen after Froyo has supposedly been installed. So far the hivemind hasn’t come to a consensus on why some phones updated fine while others were rendered inoperable, and affected users are encouraged to bring their newly-bricked units to corporate Sprint retail locations, where employees have supposedly been instructed to swap them out for new units.

While some owners who experienced successful updates are reportedly pleased with the performance of their devices, others are complaining of sluggishness and newly-implemented bugs. Admittedly, some of these “bugs” were actually announced in the changelog, such as the removal of the Memo app, or the Intercept’s inability to run Flash 10.1 (its processor doesn’t meet Adobe requirements, apparently); others, like a fresh round of GPS woes, could spell real trouble for device functionality. As a general note, these updates will erase any locally-stored data not synced to the cloud, so users need to either backup local contacts or transfer them to their SIM cards when possible (not the case with CDMA carriers).

This is the second stunted Froyo rollout in as many weeks for Sprint/Samsung, with the upgrade having briefly hit some Epic 4G handsets before being turned off; as far as we know, there were no serious issues with those upgraded phones. Samsung also had to pull an unlocked Galaxy S Froyo build from its European servers back in October, and has even found the need to revoke Galaxy S source code post-release.

Source: Sprint, Talk Android

Via: Phandroid

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Evan Blass
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