Carriers Will Have Ability to Delay WP7 Software Updates

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Anyone who uses multiple Android devices knows how haphazard the update process can seem. One handset might get FroYo one day, while another might not see the same software for another six months. With the Apple-like level of control Microsoft is taking over Windows Phone 7 handsets, there was hope that users of those smartphones could look forward to more reliable update releases. It turns out that there’s still the potential for mobile providers to delay updates, but with a few caveats.

Microsoft’s going to get itself into a regular schedule of WP7 updates, similar to the timing behind how it pushes out Windows updates. While the responsibility to deliver Android updates is largely with your mobile provider, Microsoft itself will be running the servers delivering WP7 updates.

Some of these updates are going to be minor, not requiring providers to test the impact they would have on the phones and their network. Larger updates, on the other hand, will be certified by the providers before they’re available to end users. Even though Microsoft will be running the update servers, the cell companies will have it in their power to delay your ability to install such software until they’re good and ready.

On the plus side, with Microsoft’s regular update schedule, there’s going to be a lot of pressure on providers to make sure their users aren’t getting left behind. Each future update will require all previous updates to be installed, so hopefully if there are any delays they won’t be as long as experienced by some Android devices.

Sources: Windows Phone Secrets, Ars Technica

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About The Author
Stephen Schenck
Stephen has been writing about electronics since 2008, which only serves to frustrate him that he waited so long to combine his love of gadgets and his degree in writing. In his spare time, he collects console and arcade game hardware, is a motorcycle enthusiast, and enjoys trapping blue crabs. Stephen's first mobile device was a 624 MHz Dell Axim X30, which he's convinced is still a viable platform. Stephen longs for a market where phones are sold independently of service, and bandwidth is cheap and plentiful; he's not holding his breath. In the meantime, he devours smartphone news and tries to sort out the juicy bitsRead more about Stephen Schenck!