Windows Media Player Mobile Tips and Tricks

Advertisement


SETTING UP
THE SYNC

     If you’re on Windows XP with ActiveSync 4.x,
do not turn on "Media" syncing. This will launch
a wmplayer.exe process every time you connect
the device to ActiveSync. In some cases you will
get two wmplayer.exe processes and Windows Media
Player 11 on your desktop may stop working.
Furthermore, ActiveSync will continually launch
and check Media Player 11 for changes in the
syncing set-up (thus tying up your CPU).

     Instead, we will set up the sync from Windows Media
Player 11 so that it only automatically syncs
when you specifically launch Windows Media
Player.

1. First unplug your Windows Mobile Device from
the USB port. Then launch Windows Media Player
11. Create a new playlist for which you'll use
to manage the music that you would like to sync.
I name mine according to the size of my storage
card.

2. Make sure on the Windows Mobile device that
Windows Media Player is not currently running.
End this task from the Memory control panel or
task manager. Windows Media Player has problems
syncing Album art when it is running on the
Windows Mobile device.

3. Plug the Windows Mobile device into
your computer while Windows Media Player 11 is
running and it will ask you if you want to set up an
automatic
sync partnership. Cancel this option for now,
but give your storage card a name. If you do not
cancel this option, Windows Media Player will
attempt to sync your entire media library to the
device using all of it's default settings. You
do not want this!

4. From the Sync Tab menu choose "More Options."
The resulting dialog will list the Media Player
compatible devices connected to your computer. 

(all images link to higher resolution)

5. Select the Storage Card, and click
"Properties"

6. Make sure the file conversion option is
turned on, and select your own custom quality
levels. I set my music quality to the smallest
file size to save room on the storage card.
Click OK to close these dialogs.

7. Now from the Sync Tab menu, select your
storage card and choose "Set Up Sync" from the
sub-menu.

8. Turn on the "Sync this device automatically"
option.

9. Remove all of the playlists listed under
"Playlists to sync" except for the playlists
that you want to sync with the device. You can
also choose some automatic playlists from the
"Available playlists" menu if you want to sync
playlists that change as your listening
preference changes. You can even add TV show
playlists if you're on Media Center which will
sync the latest TV shows of your preference as
they are recorded.

10. Click Finish. Media Player 11 will now start
converting and copying the selected media to
your device. The Playlists themselves will also
transfer so that you can listen to the music in
the order that you specified. The media library
on your mobile device will also be updated to
include all the media that was synced. You do
not need to use the "Update library" command.

    Once you've got it set up, this
method is by far the easiest way to manage music on
your Windows Mobile device. Since you've got only
specific playlists automatically syncing, all you
have to do is edit those playlists when you want to
change the music. So say I've got a few new MP3s
that I like, all I have to do is add them to my
"Mobile 6Gb" playlist and they'll automatically get
converted to space-saving WMA formats and copied to
my 6Gb MicroSD card the next time I plug in my
Windows Mobile device. If I get sick of certain
songs, all I have to do is remove them from the
playlist that's synced and Windows Media Player will
remove them from the device automatically. There's
no need to go digging through the File Explorer. 


TIPS

1. Do not use the "Update Library" function in
Windows Media Player on your Windows Mobile
Device. This will add all sorts of audio files
and sound effects to your media library from
both your main device and storage card. If you
have a GPS navigation program that uses WAV
files, you'll see what a mess this becomes.

2. By letting Windows Media Player convert
files to WMA/WMV, you know that the Mobile Media
Player will be able to handle the file formats.
This way there's no guessing involved as to
whether your MP3's bitrate encoding is going to
play.

3. Mobile Windows Media Player, when
launched, defaults to showing the "My Device"
library. You probably want it to open the
"Storage Card" library by default. You can
remove the "My Device" library listing option
completely by deleting the following file:
"Mobile DeviceApplication DataMicrosoftMedia
PlayerXMEMediaLibrary.mlb."  This way, only
the files in your Storage Card library will show
up in Windows Media Player Mobile.

4. If you notice a significant slow-down or
persistent memory leaks when using Windows Media
Player Mobile, you may have a corrupt library.
On the storage card, delete the following file
"Storage CardMSMETADATAXMEMediaLibrary.mlb".
You may have to tap & hold in the File Manager
window on a blank area and choose "Show All
Files" in order to see this folder. Once you
delete that file, you will have to set up the
sync again in Windows Media Player 11 on the
desktop using the steps listed above.

5. Your storage card's partnership
identification information is stored in the
hidden "WMPInfo.xml" file in the storage card's
root directory. If you want to start over in
creating a new library and sync partnership, you
can delete that file.

6. The following folder contains the digital
rights management information for your storage
card: "Storage CardWMDRM." If you
have problems playing protected content, you may
want to delete the contents of that folder and
re-sync.

7. If Windows Media Player 11 does not
recognize your device while connected, open the
Windows Task Manager (Right click task bar and
choose Task Manager). Then look at the processes
tab for two wmplayer.exe processes.  End
both of these tasks and relaunch Windows Media
Player 11.

ALBUM ART

    In most cases, if you make sure that Media
Player is not running on your device before
beginning a sync, the album art will be transferred
automatically. If your music's album art does not
transfer, and assuming you do have album art
associated with the music in Media Player 11 on your
desktop, you can copy it over manually:

1. Right click on the song in Windows Media
Player 11's Library or Now Playing view.

2. Choose "Open File Location"

3. Windows Explorer will open, showing the
location of the song you selected.

4. Make sure "Show hidden files and folders" is
turned on in Tools>Folder Options>View Tab.

5. Select the file called "Folder.jpg" and do
Ctrl+C to copy it.

6. Navigate to the folder on your storage card
where the same song is located.

7. Paste "Folder.jpg" into the folder where the
song is located on your storage card.

    Windows Media Player 11 is less
likely to successfully download and apply album art
to your songs using "Find Album Info" than Windows
Media Player 10 was. Even if the "Find Album Info"
does correctly find and display the correct album
art, the chance of it actually downloading the art
and saving the proper JPGs to the correct folder are
hit or miss. If the "Find Album Info" feature does
not work, you can always search for the album cover
manually in your web browser. Right click the image
once you find it and choose "Copy". Then in the
Windows Media Player library, right click the song's
blank album art icon and choose "Paste Album Art". 
Now Windows Media Player will convert your pasted
image into the proper JPG images in the folder where
the songs are located.

    If you have any Windows Media Player for Windows Mobile tips or tricks, click discuss below and tell us! 


Advertisement

What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Adam Z. Lein
Adam has had interests in combining technology with art since his first use of a Koala pad on an Apple computer. He currently has a day job as a graphic designer, photographer, systems administrator and web developer at a small design firm in Westchester, NY. His love of technology extends to software development companies who have often implemented his ideas for usability and feature enhancements. Mobile computing has become a necessity for Adam since his first Uniden UniPro PC100 in 1998. He has been reviewing and writing about smartphones for Pocketnow.com since they first appeared on the market in 2002.Read more about Adam Lein!