WM6 Bugs: Download Messages From The Last 14 Days

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In Windows Mobile 6, you can set the Messaging application to only download a certain number of days worth of messages off your POP3 or IMAP email server. This is great if you want to speed up downloads by not downloading everything every time you connect. The options are to download:

Today’s messages

The last 3 daysThe last 5 days

The last 7 days

The last 30 days

All messages

That difference between 7 days and 30 days is huge! Downloading 7 days of my email over WiFi is pretty quick, but it’s not really enough.

Downloading 30 days is much much slower. It would be nice if we could choose a more custom number of days. I think 14 days worth of email would be perfect for me.

Those of you with Windows Mobile 5.0 or earlier might have noticed that you do have the ability to enter a custom number of days worth of emails in the Account Options! Well look at that! Such a great feature has been removed from Windows Mobile 6.

Can anybody tell me why something so useful would be removed? Is there any way to bring it back? Or add a custom option for downloading 14 days worth of emails? Exchange ActiveSync has more sensible options for downloading email and includes an option for two weeks. It’s still not as customizable as the Windows Mobile 5.0 version, but with Exchange 2007 you can actually just search through your whole server based Exchange account and selectively download an older message you may need when you need it. And that’s great with my work email, but I also have a couple other personal email accounts on IMAP servers.

I guess maybe the Windows Mobile 5.0 Messaging program only displays the specified number of days worth of email, but still downloads all of them? That doesn’t really make sense.

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About The Author
Adam Z. Lein
Adam has had interests in combining technology with art since his first use of a Koala pad on an Apple computer. He currently has a day job as a graphic designer, photographer, systems administrator and web developer at a small design firm in Westchester, NY. His love of technology extends to software development companies who have often implemented his ideas for usability and feature enhancements. Mobile computing has become a necessity for Adam since his first Uniden UniPro PC100 in 1998. He has been reviewing and writing about smartphones for Pocketnow.com since they first appeared on the market in 2002. Read more about Adam Lein!