Bluetooth Enabled Motorcycle

Advertisement

It’s summer time and the living is easy! But how are you going to get to all those BBQs, Pool Parties, Volleyball games, and beach house parties? Do you really want to waste this beautiful weather away inside a four wheeled cage? Enter the Bluetooth Motorcycle.

Okay, okay.. It’s just a Belkin Bluetooth GPS reciever mounted to the handlebars with an elastic, but it works. I put my XDAII’s headphones inside my full-face motorcycle helmet and clip the microphone/volume/answer button piece to the chin strap. The XDAII itself sits safely inside my jacket pocket with it’s screen off so as to avoid unintended software interuptions. The navigation software running on the PDA Phone sends it’s voice prompts to my helmet whenever I need to be notified of an upcoming turn.

Safety concerns you say? Well, this setup is much safer than trying to read a paper map inside one of those clear tank-mounted cases. My PDA is not mounted to the motorcycle where it might fall off, and I don’t have to look at the screen unless I need to change my destination. This way, my eyes are always on the road ready to react instantly to any change in driving conditions.

As an extra bonus, I can also answer incoming phone calls from the chin-strap without having to take my helmet off. However, I would suggest pulling over to talk on the phone for the following reasons: 1. When driving a motorcycle your full attention must be on operating the vehicle, and 2. Your caller won’t be able to hear you because of the wind/engine noise and the XDAII’s lack of noise cancellation software.

Now who’s gonna build a Bluetooth motorcycle helmet with a heads-up-display built in?

Share This Post
Advertisement
What's your reaction?
Love It
0%
Like It
0%
Want It
0%
Had It
0%
Hated It
0%
About The Author
Adam Z. Lein
Adam has had interests in combining technology with art since his first use of a Koala pad on an Apple computer. He currently has a day job as a graphic designer, photographer, systems administrator and web developer at a small design firm in Westchester, NY. His love of technology extends to software development companies who have often implemented his ideas for usability and feature enhancements. Mobile computing has become a necessity for Adam since his first Uniden UniPro PC100 in 1998. He has been reviewing and writing about smartphones for Pocketnow.com since they first appeared on the market in 2002. Read more about Adam Lein!